Saturday, January 21, 2017

10 thoughts on Jackie.

 
1. Natalie Portman
Believe the hype, she delivers one of the bravest and most captivating performances in recent years. She is one of America's great actors.

2. I want a cigarette
Doesn't Jackie showcase smoking in a glamorous way that's rare in contemporary film?

3. Biopics don't need to be Oscarbait
All praise Pablo Larraín who delivers a biopic that has more independent and creative spirit than it had any right to. Terrific filmmaking, although...

4. It's a shame it wasn't released a year or two ago
This hasn't been a prominent fixture on award lists nor played too well with audiences and I'd say that's because its focus (that the US Presidency and the First Lady are a historically significant responsibility) seem irrelevant in the face of Donal Trump's reign. Under the Obama administration this film may have much better.

5. How will it perform at the Oscars?
Unless it pulls off an upset similar to Beasts of the Southern Wild with nominations in Picture and Director, this may find itself with a handful of nominations but not as many it probably deserves. 

6. The cinematography and editing
These work seamlessly whilst jumping around different times to give a sense of time and, more importantly, feeling. You are with Jackie throughout her emotional journey, despite it being extraordinary.

7. Deborah Findlay
It's always fun to see celebrated theatre actors pop up in films like this, and here there was Deborah Findlay as the childminder to Jackie's children. Good for her.

8. John Hurt, his accent and those scenes
I know religion is a significant aspect of society, but I would be happy if it wasn't used as a default plot device as here. Also, John Hurt fails at an Irish accent. On that note: priests don't have to Irish.

9. The music
Along Natalie and the direction, the music should be celebrated as an integral and brave part of this film's success. Kudos.

10. History is important
It's refreshing to see a film talk about the importance of history without focusing on tradition or nostalgia, instead Jackie suggests history is significant when looking to the future. 

No comments: